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A Systems Approach to Sustainable Sanitation Challenges in China (SASSI)

The overall aim of this project is to enhance our understanding of complex human-environment interactions and their sustainability outcomes. SASSI will define and advance a systems approach for sanitation which situates basic human functions within wider human ecosystems of critical social, economic and environmental resources and social institutions, cycles and order. The project will study sustainability outcomes across different sanitation systems (e.g., service-networked; sewage-based), environments (urban, peri-urban, rural) and temporal scales (historical analysis, scenario modelling) using various analytical approaches and state-of-the-art modelling. SASSI will contribute to enhanced human well-being as the overarching goal of the Sustainable Development agenda. It will address crosscutting issues in sustainable development. It will focus on Shanghai (China) as a prime example of urban transformation, drawing on quantitative and qualitative data to understand the development of infrastructure over time and explore how possible context-specific policy- or design-focused interventions may contribute to sustainable development in the future.

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Project Synergy

Principal Investigator: Ulysses Sengupta Co-Investigator: Rob Hyde Researchers:  Solon Solomou,  Sigita Zigure Funding: £5 million, Innovate UK The aim of this project is to... [more]

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Project Synergy

Project Synergy is a £5 million Innovate UK funded project. The aim of this project is to further develop innovative technologies... [more]

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ESRC Strategic Network: Data and Cities as Complex Adaptive Systems (2015 – 2017)

The ESRC Strategic Network: Data and Cities as Complex Adaptive Systems (DACAS) seeks to promote a more holistic approach through the integration of a wide range of data sources. By bringing together an international group of researchers from a range of different fields, the project supports the development of an innovative and cross-disciplinary set of tools to gather and interpret emerging data sources. The findings will benefits policy-makers, academics and other actors seeking to develop evidence-based responses to urban issues through the use of open data sources.

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Bulgaria’s Forgotten Elderly: a human ecosystem approach to ageing (2015 – 2017)

How do senior citizens in Bulgaria cope under conditions of diminishing pensions, rising living costs, uncertain health care provision, dilapidating housing and truncated family ties? This project uncovers the main concerns of Bulgaria’s abandoned elderly in cities, towns and villages. It provides much-needed insights into the challenges that senior citizens face in their everyday lives.

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Sanitation and Differentiation in Urban China (2012 – 2013)

Defecation in rapidly transforming cities may serve as an axis, linking the individual and the social, private perceptions and public policy, as well as other connected yet seemingly remote dimensions of urban life. This project contributes to a better understanding of one of the most pertaining issues for growing and developing cities and their existing and future residents: appropriate urban sanitation. Findings contribute directly to knowledge in human geography, urban anthropology and social/environmental psychology; they inform policy-makers and practitioners and advance efforts toward sustainable urban development.

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Scarcity and Creativity in the Built Environment (2010 – 2013)

Scarcity and Creativity in the Built Environment (SCIBE) explores how conditions of scarcity might affect the creativity of the different actors involved in the production of architecture and urban design, and how design-led actions might improve the built environment in the future. The research is based on the analysis of processes in four European cities: London, Oslo, Reykjavik and Vienna.

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Lives on the Borderland: the sociospatial restructuring of a neighbourhood in Shanghai (2006 – 2010)

This project explores urban borderlands as the formation, negotiation, and maintenance of multiple individual and group identities under coexistence. On the example of a sociospatially fragmented district of contemporary Shanghai, the project asks how large-scale political and economic processes of urban transformation are experienced on the ground. Drawing on the literature in geography, anthropology and environmental psychology, it combines qualitative and quantitative methods for data collection and analysis. The study provides a phenomenological account on everyday life under coexistence under sociospatial transition in contemporary Shanghai.